Speakers

KEYNOTE
SARAH HOPKINS: Justice ReInvest
Sarah Hopkins is Chair of the Just Reinvest NSW and the Managing Solicitor of Justice Projects at the Aboriginal Legal Service ACT/NSW. She is an accredited specialist in criminal law and has lectured in criminal law at the University of NSW. Sarah has been working with the Aboriginal Bourke community since 2012 and is Project Director of the Maranguka Justice Reinvestment Project in Bourke, which was the recipient of the 2015 National Rural Law and Justice Award. She is a member of the NSW Bar Association’s Joint Working Party on the Over-representation of Indigenous People in the NSW Criminal Justice System.

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Throughout her career Sarah has served on numerous committees including the Criminal Law Committee of the Law Society of NSW, the Steering Committee for the Red Cross Vulnerability Report 2015, and as Vice President of the NSW Council for Civil Liberties. In 2017 Sarah was named the Community Lawyer of the Year by the Women Lawyers’ Association of NSW.

Sarah is a well-known novelist; her best-known book is The Crimes of Billy Fish. It was Highly Commended in the ABC Fiction Award and shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize in 2008. Her second novel Speak to Me was released in May 2010 and her third novel, This Picture of You, was shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis Award for fiction.

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PRESENTATION
Justice Reinvestment Rethinking Mental Health
A justice reinvestment approach is underpinned by local, place-based and data-driven solutions led by community that deliver better social and economic outcomes for those communities. It is focused on identifying and supporting people before or as serious psycho-social issues and criminal justice interactions arise, diverting people away from the criminal justice system by addressing the underlying causes of crime.

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Evidence shows that engagement with the criminal justice system can entrench disadvantage and further traumatises people who may already be burdened with mental health issues and trauma.

Through working with communities and young people, we can see that there are a variety of social and economic costs associated with mental health issues that can be mitigated by a different approach for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in NSW.

We advocate for a holistic approach to mental health, involving the whole community. Aboriginal communities across NSW, and with our work in Bourke through Maranguka Justice Reinvestment we hear mental health is a major concern across the whole community, and especially for young people and men. Given the impact of unaddressed mental health issues on interactions in the criminal justice system, and the well-known pipeline from juvenile justice to adult incarceration, our work focuses on the well-being of young Aboriginal people. Individual or collective trauma, grief and loss, racism and discrimination, over medication and lack of alternatives to the criminal justice system are being explored by the communities we work with as well.

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PLENARY
DR OSCAR LEDERMAN: South Eastern Sydney LHD
Dr Oscar Lederman is a PhD, Associate Adjunct Lecturer at School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Sydney Accredited Exercise Physiologist at Keeping the Body in Mind, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District.

He completed a PhD on the topic of exercise in severe mental illness and has 6 years clinical experience as an Exercise Physiologist in mental health care.

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Oscar regularly provides education and training for students, mental health professionals regarding the role of exercise and AEP interventions in mental illness. Oscar regularly lectures at UNSW Sydney and University of Wollongong in Medicine and Medical Science Faculties. Oscar has presented his research internationally and has also delivered numerous professional development courses (CPD) to a range of allied health professionals on the topic of exercise and mental illness, evidence-based interventions, program implementation and burnout/compassion fatigue.

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PRESENTATION
Stepping-up mental health treatment - The role of physical activity in mental health treatment
There is overwhelming evidence that the physical health of people with severe mental illness (SMI) is compromised, resulting in substantially reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. This is largely due to high rates of cardiometabolic disease (e.g. cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome), which accounts for one third of premature mortality. Lifestyle factors including low levels of physical activity, low cardiorespiratory fitness and poor sleep quality are highly prevalent among people experiencing psychotic illness and are key modifiable risk factors contributing to poor cardiometabolic health.

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There is now a greater focus on the need for integrated services that address these lifestyle factors. Physical activity interventions are effective in improving the physical and mental health of individuals with mental illness.

This presentation will cover evidence relating to physical health in people living with mental illness, outline the evidence around physical activity/exercise and discuss strategies to translate research findings into clinical practice. Examples of existing integrated physical activity programs will also be discussed.

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SNAPSHOT PRESENTATIONS
SESSION 1A - Social Connection and Shared Care
DR JR BAKER: Primary and Community Care
JR has extensive experience in health innovation, the management of community-based health and mental health programs, population health planning, education and training, program design and development, primary care engagement, and stakeholder management. He holds a BA in Psychology from Brown University, a Graduate Diploma in Public Sector Innovation from the University of Technology Sydney, a Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology from Monash University, a Master of Psychology from Swinburne University and a PhD in Psychology from Swinburne University. JR is the CEO of Primary and Community Care.
PRESENTATION
Plus Social: Empowering individuals and building communities
Psychosocial interventions that encourage optimism and connectedness support better recovery from workplace injury and improve overall wellbeing. Plus Social is a social prescribing program for injured workers that aims to increase social and economic participation, improve psychological functioning and quality of life, and decrease health service utilisation in the longer term. Dr JR Baker will showcase the Plus Social model of care and discuss these findings.
DR JAMES IBRAHIM: Karrikin Youth Mental Health Service and Terry Hills Medical Centre
Dr Ibrahim is a General Practitioner with a special interest in mental health who manages many patients with complex mental health presentations.

He is a member of the Central and Eastern Sydney PHN’s Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Advisory Committee and is currently undertaking further GP studies in psychiatric medicine.
PRESENTATION
Social Prescribing: Engaging high risk groups through non-oratory non-conventional approaches
Dr Ibrahim will be presenting non-oratory approaches to engaging those who would typically not identify as "consumers" in the conventional mental health system. These approaches focus on programs that engage people in their mental health recovery journey without the typical one on-one clinician-patient dynamic. An example is the "the groove and wellness society", a breakdancing and hip hop NFP organisation designed to improve mental and physical health in children and adolescents, including youth from ethnically and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
ANDREW SIMPSON & PETRINA RIMMER: Sydney LHD
ANDREW SIMPSON
Andrew is the Program Manager of the Living Well, Living Longer initiative at Sydney Local Health District. This initiative is an NSW Health integrated care program which aims to improve the physical health of people with severe mental illness. He has 20+ years’ experience in mental health nursing across a variety of public health settings, inpatient & community, including 2 years in education and 6 years in leadership roles.
PETRINA RIMMER
Petrina is a Clinical Nurse Consultant GP Shared Care Liaison Clinician and mental health nurse. She has been working in Mental Health Services in Sydney Local Health District for the past 15 years. Petrina has extensive inpatient and community experience and is passionate about physical health and wellbeing of consumers accessing community mental health services using recovery-based practices.
PRESENTATION
GP & Mental Health Shared Care in the Community: Formalising Relationships to Improve Consumer Outcomes
Sydney LHD, in collaboration with CESPHN, has introduced a mental health shared care program in partnership with nine community mental health teams and General Practitioners. The program aims to improve communication between GPs and mental health services and set out clear lines of responsibility for the individual services to undertake, including actions related to screening, information sharing and physical health interventions. This presentation will discuss the details of the shared care agreements, the processes of implementation as well as the challenges of providing integrated care in community settings.
SESSION 1B - Youth Space
DR ERIN KELLY: The Matilda Centre University of Sydney
Dr Erin Kelly is a Research Psychologist at The Matilda Centre, University of Sydney. Erin completed her PhD at the University of New South Wales, for which she was awarded the Australian Rotary Health and the Alliance for the Prevention of Mental Disorders for Research Excellence Award, PhD Researcher Award (2018). Erin’s research interest is prevention and early intervention for substance use and mental disorders, with a particular focus on adolescents.
PRESENTATION
Effective Brief Intervention: Reducing emotional and behavioural problems in students
Adolescence is a critical period in the development of substance use and other mental disorders, and therefore, an optimal time to intervene. Four personality traits have been identified as risk factors for substance misuse and psychopathology: negative thinking, anxiety sensitivity, sensation-seeking and impulsivity. A brief intervention targeting these traits, Preventure, was developed in the UK and demonstrated effectiveness. Preventure was adapted for Australian schools through consultation with students, teachers and experts, and the effectiveness of the intervention in Australia was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. This presentation will discuss the findings from the translation of this program to Australian schools.
ANNE VAN VUREEN & LINA WILLMOTT: 3Bridges
ANNE VAN VUREEN
Anne Van Vuuren works for 3Bridges and is a registered General and Maternity nurse from Dunedin School of Nursing. She is State Certified Midwife (Gloucester Maternity Hospital England and completed her post certificate studies in Special and Intensive Care of Newborns at Hammersmith, Hospital London. Anne has extensive experience in nursing and welfare and has worked for the past 20 years co-managing a team of volunteer home visitors in the Sutherland Shire of Sydney. She is passionate about supporting mothers with babies. Anne is an experienced caseworker with an interest in perinatal mood disorders. Prior to working in the field of volunteer home visiting Anne worked at the Child Abuse Prevention Service as a crisis worker for at risk families and volunteer trainer for the telephone counsellor service.

LINA WILLMOTT
Lina Willmott is the Program Coordinator of 3Bridges Community Early Years Support Service, a role she shares with Anne Van Vuuren. Lina is a social worker with a Bachelor of Social Work (Hons) from the University of New South Wales. Lina has extensive experience in both government and non-government sectors including Health, TAFE, Home and Community Care (HACC), Australian Red Cross and non-government organisations. She was recently awarded the 2018 Sydney Health Community Network Wellness Award for Wellbeing.
PRESENTATION
Holding & Helping - Early Years Support Service
Early Years Support Service (EYSS) is a volunteer program that supports mothers of children aged 0 – 3 who have minimal family and community support, multiple births, have ill health or a disability. EYSS is a vital early intervention program for mothers who are vulnerable due to isolation from family or friends. EYSS are proud winners of the NSW Volunteer Team of the Year 2016 awarded by the Centre for Volunteering, and Winners of the Sydney Health Community.
NOHA AHMED: 3Bridges
Noha Ahmed has a Bachelor of Social Work and is currently completing a Masters in Secondary Education. Noha has extensive experience in Out of Home Care and working with young people in the community and in educational settings.  Working as a Complex Case Manager provided opportunities to work alongside Juvenile Justice, Koori Court and Aboriginal Services. Noha gained a great insight into the extraordinary work of the multidisciplinary teams that support young people engaged in the Justice System. Noha currently works with local schools as a Youth Worker under the 3Bridges SWEEP program, a program designed to support students in a personal, holistic and meaningful manner.  Noha describes her work as a privilege, she is an advocate for Social Justice and is very connected to community, Noha believes that every young person has the right to be heard, to be respected and to be nurtured.
PRESENTATION
Student Wellbeing and Engagement Program
The ethos of the Student Well-Being and Engagement Program (SWEEP) service is to ensure that the young person is recognised as an active partner who can, and should, have opportunities and resources to shape their lives. The relationship and dialogue between the young person and youth development worker is central to the learning process.

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We ensure that we have a healthy and varied program of activities which is at the heart of our work and one of the key elements is to involve young people in the program planning.

Our workers are handpicked and provide support that aligns with our young people’s needs and readiness for intervention. 60% of 1:1 for the Student Well-being and Engagement Program (SWEEP) referrals will come directly from young people and 40% from teachers, counsellor, well-being staff, and deputy principals and in serious cases the school principal.

We are currently working with over 400 vulnerable young people each month that present with mental health issues, anxiety, domestic violence, lack of parental support, risk of being expelled from school, behavioural issues, and risk of criminal intent.

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SESSION 2A - Moving Towards Better Mental Health
LAURA EDWARDS, SIAN STANLEY & JO UPHAM: Keeping the Body in Mind, South Eastern Sydney LHD
LAURA EDWARDS
Laura Edwards is an accredited Exercise Physiologist with a Masters from the University of Sydney. Over the last five years, Laura’s work has focused on providing exercise programs, healthy lifestyle support and engagement opportunities for individuals and communities that have experienced disadvantage or adversity due to social inequities. Laura has worked in the treatment of chronic health issues within the Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network (JH&FMHN), worked with individuals experiencing homelessness and drug & alcohol issues at the Wayside Chapel, in the Keeping the Body In Mind (KBIM) team at South Eastern Sydney Local Health District (SESLHD) Community Mental Health, and the Bulbuwil Aboriginal Healthy lifestyle program in Primary Integrated & Community Health.
SIAN STANLEY
Sian is a Peer Support Worker with South Eastern Sydney Local Health District located at Prince of Wales hospital as part of the Peer Supported Transfer of Care (PEER STOC) Program. Sian was previously with the Keeping the Body in Mind team as a Peer Health Coach on the Peer outreach Wellness Coach and Healthcare (PoWCH) Navigator project supporting consumers with physical and nutritional health interventions.
JO UPHAM
Jo is a Peer Support Worker who has worked with the South Eastern Sydney Local Health District Keeping Body in Mind (KBIM) program as a Peer Health Coach Navigator since March 2019. Physical wellbeing and nutrition are integral to her day to day life and story of recovery.
PRESENTATION
Peer Navigator Role: Changing the landscape of lived experience
South Eastern Sydney Local Health District Community Mental Health’s the Peer outreach Wellness Coach and Healthcare (PoWCH) Navigator project is a health coaching pilot intervention, which seeks to redress the shortfall in life expectancy experienced by individuals with serious mental illness (SMI). The PoWCH Navigator supports consumers engaged with community mental health services who receive long-acting injectable (depot) antipsychotic medication for SMI. The PoWCH Navigator guides progress towards improved physical health and wellbeing through a holistic person-centred approach, drawing on the strengths of the individual and working within an integrated care setting including carers, lifestyle intervention specialists and the wider mental health team.
ASSOCIATE PROFFESOR DR ELIZABETH SCOTT: Brain Mind Centre University of Sydney
Associate Professor Elizabeth Scott has expertise in youth mood disorders, service developments for youth mental health, as well as sleep and circadian dysfunction.

She is the Director of Uspace – inpatient services for young people with emerging psychiatric disorders at St Vincent’s Private Hospital. Her research is affiliate at the Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney and the School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame.

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Associate Professor Scott has substantial clinical expertise in the medical complications of psychiatric disorders, neuroimmunology and structural imaging in depressive and anxiety disorders. She also has extensive experience in developing and evaluating comprehensive assessment and management programs for young people with mental health problems through her work with the Brain & Mind Centre as well as the headspace programs in Central and Eastern Sydney.

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PRESENTATION
Associate Professor Elizabeth Scott will present her finds on premature cardiovascular disease (pCVD) being one of the key drivers of shortened life expectancy is an increased incidence of particularly in major depressive, bipolar, and psychotic disorders.

She will discuss the findings of two large samples of patient presenting to services for mental health care and examine the role of metabolic dysfunction in pCVD, with key markers of metabolic dysfunction being weight gain and the emergence of insulin resistance.
VICKI LANGAN: Neami National
Vicki currently holds the position of NSW Health and Wellbeing Manager for Neami National. Vicki has a background in Sports Science, Sports Development and Juvenile Justice, as well as working in and a lived experience of addiction, and providing family counselling. Previously she worked in homelessness within Neami's Aboriginal Assertive Outreach Service and before moving into Neami’s National Health Promotion team.
PRESENTATION
Peer Physical Health: Active8 - A Peer Lead Physical Health and Wellbeing Project
The Active8 Coaching for Physical Health program offers individual support by a Peer Support Worker plus participation in the Eat, Plant, Learn group program. The program support consumers to identify and work on physical health-related goals; as well as improve their health literacy, engagement with health services, self-management and self-efficacy.
SESSION 2B - Collaborative Approaches
JACK FREESTONE: ACON
Jack Freestone is the Manager of alcohol and drug mental health programs for ACON. Jack holds a Master of Public Health and has five years’ experience managing health promotion programs for adults. He has worked across government and non-government sectors in both the UK and Australia and collaborates with UNSW, USYD and NDARC on research relating to the mental health and AOD experiences of LGBTIQ people.
PRESENTATION
ACON Rainbow Lived Experience Network
ACON’s Rainbow Mental Health Lived Experience Network is funded by the Mental Health Commission and is a network of LGBTIQ people from across the state of NSW with lived experience of mental health distress.

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The Rainbow Mental Health Lived Experience network was established in recognition of the need to provide LGBTIQ community members who participate in consultation and co-design processes with formal training and support. Network members receive training on purposeful storytelling, explanatory frameworks around mental health distress, the principles of co-design and co-production and how to act as community representatives in a variety of contexts.

This presentation will outline how colleagues working in the mental health sector can work with network members throughout their own consultation, co-design and co-production processes.

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TRACY TABVUMA & LAWRENCE REEVES: South Western Sydney LHD
TRACY TABVUMA
Tracy is a registered nurse who holds Mental Health Nursing credentials. . She is a Clinical Nurse Specialist at Birunji Mental Health Unit, Campbelltown Hospital, and Safewards Project Officer. Scholarship recipient and mental health nursing expert, Tracy Tabvuma, is leading exciting changes as part of the Safewards project, a nurse-initiated program designed to improve communication and teamwork between staff and consumers. Tracy is using her practical knowledge and overseas research to improve the way staff communicate and cope with challenging behaviours on all mental health wards across the district, as a result of the Safewards program.
LAWRENCE REEVES
Lawrence Reeves is a mental health consumer representative and an advocate for the last five years. He sits on the Mental Health Consumer and Carer’s Committee (MHCCC) and a number of other committees within the South Western Sydney Local Health District (SWSLHD). He has been involved with national projects as mental health consumer representative working with a team from Flinders University to assist consumers and support services to transition to the NDIS.
PRESENTATION
Moving towards a collaborative project implementation approach: South West Sydney Local Health District’s Safewards experience
This presentation will address how a participatory, co-production approach facilitated a whole of person approach resulting in the development and implementation of the Safewards initiative. The presenters will share the results of the process and principles of co-operative inquiry and include a participatory investigation into the co-production experience.
GRACE CHERRINGTON: Carers NSW
Grace Cherrington has a lived experience as mental health carer and as a consumer. She currently works within the Policy and Research Team at Carers NSW, the peak non-government organisation for family and friend carers in NSW, where she coordinates carer representation and contributes to policy and systemic advocacy activities to improve support for carers. Grace holds a bachelor’s in Social Science majoring in Gender Studies from Macquarie University and has an interest in gender theory and mental health policy.
PRESENTATION
Rethinking carer engagement in a health setting as an opportunity to improve carer wellbeing
This presentation identifies health appointments as key opportunities for health practitioners to identify carers and refer them to necessary support. Caring for a family member or friend is often associated with lower health and wellbeing outcomes, with carers reporting higher levels of distress and being more likely to have a disability than non-carers. A survey of NSW carers suggests that carer recognition, inclusion and support from health services may support carer health and wellbeing. The survey indicates missed opportunities to address carers’ own mental and physical health needs. While carers are often accessing health services with or on behalf of the person they care for, there remains limited focus on the health and wellbeing of the carer in these settings.
SESSION 3A - Creating Safe Spaces
DR JODIE LANDSTRA & MARC ROGERSON: St Vincent’s Hospital
JODIE LANDSTRA
Jodie is as Clinical Psychologist at St Vincent’s Hospital with 20 years of experience in mental health and hospital settings.
MARC ROGERSON
Marc is a Mental Health Nurse Assistant and has been working in Psychiatric Hospitals and Community agencies for 20 years. Together they have facilitated seven Optimal Health Program groups over the last year.
PRESENTATION
Promoting Optimal Health in Suicide Prevention
Promoting health and wellbeing for individuals who have experienced a suicidal crisis is crucial.

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This presentation will focus on two programs; the Suicide Prevention through Connection (SPconnect) Program and the Optimal Health Program.

The SPConnect Program was developed with a focus on improving not only mental health but physical health. It is a partnership between St Vincent’s, Prince of Wales and Royal Prince Alfred hospitals and Neami National. The presentation will focus on describing the group program and highlighting the changes that participants have made.

The Optimal Health Group Program was developed by Frameworks for Health in Victoria and is widely used across Australia in Mental Health, chronic diseases, suicide prevention and for carers. The optimal health wheel shows the participant’s self-rated change across physical, social, emotional, spiritual, occupational and intellectual domains.

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JULIET MIDDLETON: AfterCare Queensland
JULIET MIDDLETON
B. Pharm (Hons), PGDip Bus, MBA, GAICD
Juliet has 15 years’ experience as a senior leader in healthcare improving design and delivery of community health care services, driving quality and efficiency and the meaningful use of data. Juliet is the General Manager at Aftercare responsible for delivery of community mental health services and programs in NSW, QLD and VIC.
PRESENTATION
Collaborative Design of Safe Spaces for Local Communities
Juliet’s presentation will examine the key elements of the Safe Space model as an innovative local Suicide Prevention response which successfully partners across community and clinical mental health services to provide a safe and welcoming environment providing clinical and non-clinical responses for people experiencing psychological distress and suicidality.
CLAIRE VERNON: JewishCare
Claire has been Chief Executive Officer at JewishCare since January 2007. Claire came to the non-government sector after many years in senior executive roles in New South Wales State Government Departments. Claire started her career as a social worker in the 1970s and has worked across most areas of human services including health, justice and disability in policy, program development and operations.

JewishCare is the major provider of social services in the NSW Jewish Community with over 280 staff in the areas of community aged care, disability services, mental health programs and responding to families and individuals in need.
PRESENTATION
Jewish Suicide Prevention Strategy
JewishCare has been providing support for community members and their families living with mental health issues for many years. The idea of developing a focussed 2-year Jewish Suicide Prevention Strategy came about in 2017. It is based on an integrated community wide approach with over 20 communal organisations involved. The presentation will include the processes and achievements under the Strategy.
SESSION 3B - Whole of Health
SUE WOOD & ANGELO LAIOS: Bobby Goldsmith Foundation
SUE WOOD
Sue has as worked in the disability sector since 1995 and worked in the HIV sector for Bobby Goldsmith (BGF) foundation since 2005. Current leading a team of Case managers and Case workers. Became a Chronic disease Self-Management Program Master Trainer in 2015 and facilitating programs since then as well as training leaders in the field. Completed Diploma of Community Services 2013 and women in Leadership 2017.
ANGELO LAIOS
Angelo has worked with the Bobby Goldsmith Foundation (BGF) for over 13 years. Today he is Manager of the Community Support Program and oversees a team of 30 staff, who provide Community Support Services to PLHIV. Angelo played a major role in developing the current suite of Community Support Services provided by BGF.

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BGF have introduced several community programs to support PLHIV t to remain living independently in the community. Angelo is a Master trainer in the CDSMP, Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. On completion of the program, participants are armed with self-management skills which support them to make informed decisions regarding their own needs, plus the ability to consider and the steps required to achieve them.

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PRESENTATION
The Bobby Goldsmith Foundation: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program
This presentation is an introduction to the Bobby Goldsmith Foundation’s successful Chronic Disease Self-Management Program or CDSMP.

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The program is evidence-based and was developed by Stanford University in the early 1990’s. Its proven success has meant that CDSMP is now used in more than 17 countries around the world. The program of workshops is specifically tailored to people living with HIV using the prescribed book; Living a Healthy Life with HIV. Workshop Leaders have lived experience with chronic illness themselves in order to provide a supportive, mentoring role.

The CDSMP program covers topics such as; fitness, eating well, dealing with emotions and depression, problem solving, medications, action planning, goal setting, and talking to your doctors to name a few.

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DONATELLA CIFALI: Multicultural HIV and Hepatitis Service, Sydney LHD
Donatella is a Senior Social Worker at the Multicultural HIV and Hepatitis Service (Diversity Programs and Strategies Hub, SLHD) with 5 years’ experience. Since 1993 Donatella has worked in the areas of drug health, mental health, criminal justice, aged care advocacy, Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing, family support and domestic violence.

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She has presented at LHD, State and National conferences and forums, to raise awareness of HIV-related access and equity issues affecting the social and emotional wellbeing of CALD communities and individuals, in the context of successful health promotion campaigns which have seen a significant drop in infection rates in Australian-born communities.

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PRESENTATION
Living positive, living well: addressing the social and emotional wellbeing impact of HIV in CALD communities
This presentation looks at the support the Multicultural HIV and Hepatitis Service (MHAHS) has provided to people from CALD communities in NSW who live with HIV since 1991. The MHAS links clients with bi-lingual, bi-cultural Cultural Support Workers, who walk with them as they learn to live with HIV, experience unconditional acceptance and come to understand that a good life is possible.

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At a time when HIV is virtually ending within Australian-born populations, MHAHA addresses the ongoing support needs of those differently impacted by HIV. Working within communities to dispel stigma and increase understanding, with a view to ending HIV and building capacity for social and emotional wellbeing in all communities.

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JACKSON GODING: Odyssey House
Jackson is the Coordinator for Community Services Odyssey House NSW. He is a psychotherapist who has a wide array of experience working with different groups of people, dealing with issues such as trauma, suicide, addictions, and mood disorders, as well as vulnerable children in care.

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Jackson works with clients from the time when trauma first happens to vulnerable, at-risk young people, through to when maladaptive coping mechanisms for dealing with life’s adversities develop into addiction, complex mental health issues and suicide risk.

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PRESENTATION
Odyssey House: Integrating AOD and Mental Health
Odyssey House is working to close the segregation between AOD and mental health services, that results in many clients falling through the gaps. Over the last two years, the Community Services sector has grown exponentially, assisting more clients with a range of substance dependence issues, in various stages of their recovery journey, within an integrated model of care.

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This presentation will give you a glimpse into our clients’ recovery journey, we will present our innovative, evidence-based group programs designed to address alcohol and drug issues while supporting clients’ mental health recovery.

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SESSION 4A - Innovative Approaches
LAUREN GARDNER: The Matilda Centre University of Sydney
Lauren Gardner is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Matilda Centre for Research in Mental Health and Substance Use at the University of Sydney. Her research aims to understand and prevent chronic disease by targeting physical and mental health determinants among adolescents. Her current research focus is on developing internet-based preventive interventions for secondary school students. She is working on the Health4Life Initiative which aims to develop and evaluate the first eHealth program simultaneously targeting six key lifestyle risk factors (physical activity, diet, sedentary recreational screen time, sleep, alcohol and smoking) to reduce the risk of chronic disease among secondary school students. She is also working on Climate Schools, a universal, online school-based program designed to prevent alcohol and other drug use and related harms among adolescents.
PRESENTATION
An eHealth intervention to improve mental health and well-being in adolescence and beyond: The Health4Life Initiative
This presentation will look at the result of a study aiming to develop and evaluate an eHealth school-based prevention program to concurrently target the Big 6 risk factors among 12-15-year-olds, known as the Health4Life Initiative. Unhealthy behaviours, such as eating poorly, smoking, risky alcohol use and physical inactivity, are known risk factors for chronic disease and mental disorders.

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School-based interventions that simultaneously address multiple lifestyle risk behaviours have the potential to efficiently improve the physical and mental health of young people. The trial was conducted in 72 schools (approximately 7200 Year 7 students) across New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia.

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MARK SPINKS & MATTHEW TUKAKI: Babana Aboriginal
Mark Spinks is the Chair of Babana Aboriginal Men’s Group and Tribal Warrior Association. Mark has been engaged at the heart of the Redfern Community for more than fifteen years with a special focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men’s health and wellbeing. Mark is former nominee for the Australian of the Year and has been working together with Matthew Tukaki to develop and implement community based models of care and support when it comes to suicide prevention.
Matthew Tukaki is the former Chair of Suicide Prevention Australia and the National Coalition for Suicide Prevention in Australia. He has worked in a range of governance roles in the sector following the passing of his best friend from suicide. Matthew is also a former Australian Representative to the UN and Global Head of Drake International. He has been working alongside Mark Spinks for the last four years developing and implementing a very community based model of suicide prevention in the Inner City of Sydney when it comes to Indigenous suicide.
PRESENTATION
Babana Aboriginal Approach to Suicide Prevention
This presentation will focus on the development and design of the Babana Aboriginal approach to suicide prevention in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. It was also discuss the range of various activities that both identify people who may be in trouble and seeks to work with them. From the development of the traditional yarning circle model, community awareness models, messaging and well-being campaigns and resource building.
ANDREW SIMPSON & DR ANDREW MCDONALD: Sydney Local Health District
Andrew Simpson is the Program Manager at Sydney Local Health District with the Living Well, Living Longer initiative. This initiative is an NSW health integrated care program which aims to improve the physical health of people with severe mental illness. He has 20+ years’ experience in mental health nursing across a variety of public health settings, inpatient & community, including 2 years in education and 6 years in leadership roles.
Dr Andrew McDonald is the Director of Clinical Services is responsible for the leadership and management of mental health medical staff. Andrew’s also provides clinical leadership and has responsibility for providing medical and clinical governance advice to the service executive.
PRESENTATION
Implementing a Project ECHO Hub into a public mental health service
Project ECHO was conceived in New Mexico in 2003 to meet local healthcare needs for people who don’t have access to specialists. The model uses video conferencing to link local clinicians (the ‘spokes’) with a group of experts (the ‘hub’) on a weekly basis in virtual clinics, with the aim of sharing knowledge and expanding treatment capacity to reduce health disparities.

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Sydney LHD sent a team of seven to Toronto, Canada for two days of immersion training into the Project ECHO model. There are now plans to create three hubs within the LHD, each filled with 6-10 local experts in the areas of eating disorders, intellectual disability, and cardiometabolic health in mental health consumers.

As well as expert clinicians, the hub will include a technical facilitator whose role is to navigate the various video links, and a librarian who will be on hand to look up best practice guidelines to assist with recommendations. The team are hoping to recruit participants from across the PHN including GPs and practice nurses.

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SESSION 4B - Body and Mind
CAMERON WILSON: Mood Active
Cameron is the Founder & Committee President of Mood Active.

Since 2013, Cameron’s role with Mood Active has included Operations Manager, Head Trainer, Senior Cardio Tennis Trainer, and Facilitator of our "Well-being Workout" programs. At age 54, I have lived an entire adult life battling bipolar depression and anxiety (bi-polar Type II). I've been fortunate to have exercise as an ever-reliable stick to chase away the Black Dog.

Cameron has delivered presentations on exercise v depression/anxiety at UNSW (2017), Sydney TAFE (2016 & 2017), and at Tennis Australia's National Coach Conference (2019).
PRESENTATION
Exercise versus depression/anxiety - are we really utilising it?
Updated research on efficacy of exercise to relieve symptoms of depression/anxiety, latest findings, testimonials from people in our program, findings from a (published) study on (under) prescription and (under) utilisation of exercise for better mental health, and our collective responsibility to advocate for and/or facilitate the building of exercise habits for all physically able people with low-intensity mental health needs.
HANNAH BOYD: New Leaf Naturopathic Health
Hannah is an experienced clinical naturopath who works with all ages across many specialities in complementary health. As a naturopath, nutritionist and herbalist she supports her patients with a strong evidence-based approach, personalised and client-focused treatments. Her clinical interests are focused around women’s health, mental health, autoimmunity and digestive health. Hannah is also a director of the Naturopaths and Herbalists Association of Australia.
PRESENTATION
Gut Health – the missing link in supporting your patient’s mental health
An exploration of the role of digestive health in patients experiencing anxiety and depression. Hannah will present the latest research on the role of nerve signalling between the brain and the gut, and how we can support our patients presenting with complex physical and mental conditions.
WORKSHOP SESSIONS
WORKSHOP SESSION 1
DR SUZIE HUDSON: Network of Alcohol and other Drug Agencies
Suzie Hudson is the Clinical Director of Network of Alcohol and other Drugs Agencies (NADA). She is an accredited mental health Social Worker and has over 20 years’ clinical experience in the fields of substance misuse, mental health, forensics, research and evaluation. Suzie has worked, developed and managed community-based and residential alcohol and drug services both in Australia and overseas with a focus on methamphetamines. Currently the Clinical Director at NADA (Network of Alcohol and Drugs Agencies) she also provides private consultancy, training workshops designed to enhance the capacity of the AOD treatment sector and maintains a private counselling and clinical supervision practice. Suzie has a PhD in public health and community medicine.
PRESENTATION
Embedding client feedback into reflective practice
We have seen some good progress across both the mental health and alcohol and other drug treatment sectors when it comes to outcomes measurement and client feedback – but how well do we use this information?

In many ways feedback from our clients related to how they are tracking or experiencing a service can become routine rather than informing active reflection. Weaving the consumer/client voice into reflective practice is the gold standard in therapeutic work and we need tools and techniques to do that.

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One approach is Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT), a pan theoretical approach that can be applied in therapy to actively enquire about both the quality of the improvements that are occurring as a result of the therapeutic engagement as well as the experience of the relationship between practitioner and consumer/client.

Through establishing client feedback as a part of routine practice we are able to more consistently respond to client need, adapting our approach in real-time rather than waiting until it is too late, and the client simply decides to disengage. Reflective practice is key to quality therapeutic work that results in useful outcomes for clients – but without the client/consumer voice, we are missing an essential ingredient.

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WORKSHOP SESSION 2
DR CHRISTINA MAREL & ERIN MADDEN: The Matilda Centre University of Sydney
CHRISTINA MAREL
Christina is the Senior Research Fellow and Program Lead of Treatment and Translation among Complex Populations at the Matilda Centre for Research in Mental Health and Substance Use, University of Sydney. She is undertaking an NHMRC TRIP fellowship (2019-21) to bridge the evidence to practice gap in relation to heroin dependence.

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Her research focuses on improving our understanding of, and responses to, co-occurring mental and substance use disorders, and translating research findings to clinicians and consumers. In collaboration with clinicians, carers, consumers, academics and other researchers, I recently led the development of the National Comorbidity Guidelines and accompanying online training program. Some of my other work focuses on long-term trajectories of heroin dependence and co-occurring mental disorders.

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ERIN MADDEN
Erin is a Research Officer at The Matilda Centre, working on the dissemination and online translation of the National Comorbidity Guidelines.
PRESENTATION
Treating the person, not the illness: Taking a whole health approach
The high prevalence of comorbidity means clinicians are often faced with the need to manage complex psychiatric symptoms that may interfere with their ability to treat patients’ alcohol or other drug (AOD) use. To improve the ability of healthcare workers to respond to people experiencing co-occurring mental and substance use conditions, the Australian Government Department of Health funded the development of evidence-based National Comorbidity Guidelines and an accompanying online training program.

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The Guidelines were developed in consultation and collaboration with clinicians, researchers, consumers, and carers nationwide, and are underpinned by a holistic healthcare approach that focuses on treating the person, not the illness.

The Guidelines and online training program aim to increase the knowledge and awareness of comorbid mental health conditions in AOD treatment settings, improve confidence and skills of healthcare workers, increase the uptake of evidence-based care, and ultimately, improve the outcomes for people with co-occurring mental health conditions.

The translation of this resource into an accompanying online program was based on best-practice principles for e-learning.

This presentation will provide an overview of this program and highlight preliminary findings from the online training evaluation.

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PANEL DISCUSSION
PANEL DISCUSSION
Aboriginal Workers Circle
A panel discussion between Aboriginal staff employed in programs commissioned by CESPHN who participate in an Aboriginal Workers Circle. An exciting opportunity to hear first-hand how and why this learning circle works for members in a discussion led by Sharleen McKenzie, circle facilitator.
WELLNESS SESSION
AMY GIULIANO: Selph Health Studios
A Yoga and Meditation teacher with a background in Hatha Vinyasa, Yin Yoga, Pre and Post Natal, Instinctive Meditation, and Pranayama. Amy has been teaching for over 7 years and now is the Curator of Selph Health Studios Yoga and Pilates space. Selph Health Studios opened in 2018 and is an integrated wellness space. It offers practitioner services covering the four pillars of health; structural, emotional, nutritional and movement.
PRESENTATION
Get Grounded - stress reduction through Yoga
Share the last session with Amy Giuliano learning about stress and the nervous system, cycle of meditation and how we can make meditation accessible in the everyday busyness.

Learn how to use movement and breath work in a practical way to quickly reduce the effects of stress.
EXHIBITOR DEMONSTRATION
DR ALESSANDRA DOOLAN
Dr Alessandra Doolan is Principal of The Health and Technology Advisory Group (HTAG), an independent group specialising in advocacy, policy, healthcare access, and community support. Alessandra has a PhD in Clinical Research Medicine and Master of Public Health, with over 20 years of experience in healthcare in the public and private sectors including the areas of community care and hospital quality management systems (QMS).

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HTAG is an NDIS Registered Provider specialising in Innovative Community Participation and Assistive Technology.

Alessandra holds various roles including affiliate title with Sydney Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health at The University of Sydney.

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ABSTRACT
Social, community and group recreational participation can improve cognitive functioning and self-esteem, and conversely decrease depression and anxiety. Global studies have shown social participation and developing friendships have direct association with mental health and wellbeing. Increased social and community participation through peer-supported groups leads to improved behavioural issues.

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Mental health conditions are the single largest cause of disability in Australia, accounting for 24% of the burden of non-fatal disease. The burden of mental health conditions is increasing in Australia, with around 25% of those with mental illness having more than one disorder. Increases are also due to the growing prevalence in chronic conditions (1 in 2 Australians have a chronic condition) and increasing ageing population (15% of population is aged 65 years and over). Mental health conditions have substantial impact at the personal, social and economic levels – the highest impact during late teens to early adult years, the period during which people are usually establishing families and independent working lives. Mental illness is also most prevalent among those with lower socioeconomic background/status (SES), Indigenous community and individuals with permanent disability (including physical).

A Capacity Building Program (Program) to increase social and community participation has been developed by the Health and Technology Advisory Group (HTAG) to improve the mental health and wellbeing of individuals with permanent disability living in the community. The benefits of the Program are evaluated to show improvements in behavioural and functional domains in a real-world setting. Importantly, overall outcomes of the Program will show increased social and economic gains for the individual participants and community by reducing economic burden (e.g. paid employment, volunteering), and cost savings to the healthcare system gained through reduction in healthcare costs (decreased emergency department admissions, reduced GP visits).

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